History buffs

ok y’all a test for the history buffs, lets see if you know

why does Dr pepper have on its bottles 10-2-4? I just discovered the why just now…have fun!!

I know practically nothing about Asian countries.

I always heard 3rd kingdoms in our various dramas, well I discovered something and thought I’d share this, I hoped you enjoy

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I don’t know if the other side of the world relates to this, but thought it is something different. enjoy

we are ancient!!

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This photograph taken in the 1890s captures a Chinese woman who had her feet bound since childhood. Footbinding was a traditional Chinese practice involving the breaking and tight binding of young girls’ feet to alter their shape and size. The resulting modified feet were referred to as “lotus feet,” while the shoes designed for these feet were called “lotus shoes.” In ancient China, having bound feet was regarded as a symbol of social status and feminine beauty. However, footbinding inflicted great pain, restricted women’s mobility, and led to lifelong disabilities. It was not until the early 20th century that the practice began to decline due to anti-footbinding campaigns. Wealthier urban women abandoned footbinding earlier than their less privileged counterparts in rural areas. As of 2007, only a few elderly Chinese women who had experienced footbinding were still alive.

[#HistoryCaptain](#historycaptain - ရှာဖွေရန်?

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This was a brutal practice, I believe back then men liked these small feet or found them even erotic. Another mutilation on women. I once saw in a local museum an exhibit of shoes and these lotus shoes were shown including the history of binding, the shoes were so small and it must have bee gruel to walk on such feet. Apparently it is still done somewhere.

PS Wearing wrong styled shoes can also lead to long term health problems with feet.

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As another icon from the 80’s has left us leaving us her music that majority can relate to and which left certain memories during teenage hood. Let’s see what was in that era that folks lived :rofl:

more pictures here:

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and look it, she has some of my maiden name/ hmmmmm, detective??

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In 1856, twenty-three-year-old widow Kate Warne walked into the office of the Pinkerton Detective Agency in Chicago, announcing that she had seen the company’s ad and wanted to apply for the job. “Sorry,” Alan Pinkerton told her, “but we don’t have any clerical staff openings. We’re looking to hire a new detective.” Pinkerton would later describe Warne as having a “commanding” presence that morning. “I’m here to apply for the detective position,” she replied. Taken aback, Pinkerton explained to Kate that women aren’t suited to be detectives, and then Kate forcefully and eloquently made her case. Women have access to places male detectives can’t go, she noted, and women can befriend the wives and girlfriends of suspects and gain information from them. Finally, she observed, men tend to become braggards around women who encourage boasting, and women have keen eyes for detail. Pinkerton was convinced. He hired her.

Shortly after Warne was hired, she proved her value as a detective by befriending the wife of a suspect in a major embezzlement case. Warne not only gained the information necessary to arrest and convict the thief, but she discovered where the embezzled funds were hidden and was able to recover nearly all of them. On another case she extracted a confession from a suspect while posing as a fortune teller. Pinkerton was so impressed that he created a Women’s Detective Bureau within his agency and made Kate Warne the leader of it.

In her most famous case, Kate Warne may have changed the history of the world. In February 1861 the president of the Wilmington and Baltimore railroad hired Pinkerton to investigate rumors of threats against the railroad. Looking into it, Pinkerton soon found evidence of something much more dangerous—a plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln before his inauguration. Pinkerton assigned Kate Warne to the case. Taking the persona of “Mrs. Cherry,” a Southern woman visiting Baltimore, she managed to infiltrate the secessionist movement there and learn the specific details of the scheme—a plan to ■■■■ the president-elect as he passed through Baltimore on the way to Washington.

Pinkerton relayed the threat to Lincoln and urged him to travel to Washington from a different direction. But Lincoln was unwilling to cancel the speaking engagements he had agreed to along the way, so Pinkerton resorted to a Plan B. For the trip through Baltimore Lincoln was secretly transferred to a different train and disguised as an invalid. Posing as his caregiver was Kate Warne. When she afterwards described her sleepless night with the President, Pinkerton was inspired to adopt the motto that became famously associated with his agency: “We never sleep.” The details Kate Warne had uncovered had enabled the “Baltimore Plot” to be thwarted.

During the Civil War, Warne and the female detectives under her supervision conducted numerous risky espionage missions, with Warne’s charm and her skill at impersonating a Confederate sympathizer giving her access to valuable intelligence. After the war she continued to handle dangerous undercover assignments on high-profile cases, while at the same time overseeing the agency’s growing staff of female detectives.

Kate Warne, America’s first female detective, died of pneumonia at age 34, on January 28, 1868, one hundred fifty-five years ago today. “She never let me down,” Pinkerton said of one of his most trusted and valuable agents. She was buried in the Pinkerton family plot in Chicago.

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Ancient History HH

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Sakya Monastery. The Library Was Discovered In Tibet Behind A Huge Wall (60 Meters Long And 10 Meters High). It Contains 84,000 Secret Manuscripts,which Include The History Of Mankind Over 1000 Years Old.

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That’s my kind of history lesson. Very fascinating.

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:nerd_face: Let me in I tell ya! This is a find! :nerd_face:

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Interesting about men and long hair

Old Photos

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LONG HAIR

Traditionally, long hair was always a symbol of masculinity. All of history’s great warriors had long hair, from the Greeks (who wrote odes to their heroes’ hair) to the Nordic, from the American Indians (famous for their long shiny hair) to the Japanese. And the longer and beautiful the hair was, the more manly the warrior was considered. Vikings flaunted their braids and samurai wore their long hair as a symbol of their honor (they cut their braid when they lose honor).

When a warrior was captured, his mane was cut to humiliate him, to take away his beauty. That custom resumed in what is today military service. There when new soldiers begin their training the first thing they do is cut their hair to undermine their self-esteem, make them submissive and make them see who’s boss.

The Romans were the ones who “invented” short hair so to speak, between the 1st and 5th centuries AD… In battles they believed this gave them defensive advantages, since their opponents couldn’t grab them by the hair. This also helped them to recognize each other in the battlefield.

Short hair on men is a relatively new “invention” that has nothing to do with aesthetics.

But today we often see men being humiliated, sometimes called “gay” for wearing long hair, not knowing that short hair is actually the “anti-masculine” and is a repressive social imposition, while long hair symbolizes freedom

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:kr: Korean - influenced the fashion - Brazilians :brazil:

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My peoples! I particularly like these two. :blush:

  • A generation who played board games, and card games on rainy days.
  • A generation who had parents who were there!
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@mirjam_465,
This info by itself, fits this thread better, what about your visit, or what a friend shared? That’s what I’m asking for, kind of like the Hansel, and Gretel trail of bread grumbs tale.

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LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE your post.

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I don’t remember this one, think was in the war era

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“A mechanical greased pig” is how Hill Standard’s Barrel-of-Fun was described in 1922. The barrel was built to be anchored in a slab of concrete, and kids were encouraged to dive over the top of the 140-pound steel cask or attempt to hug its smooth surface and spin themselves silly. Some adventurous youngsters would even step up on top, logrolling style—but unlike that famous woodsman’s sport, the inevitable spill was farther and the landing was neither soft nor splashy. Though somewhat rare, playground balance barrels still exist today, but they are nearly always situated above a bed of soft wood chips, built lower to the ground, and equipped with helpful handles to keep the user from taking a header.

theres more, if you would like to see how our grandparents could have been killed at recess interesting for sure!!

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some were still around when I was younger.

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