How long does people live home before moving out?

^- Was wondering what is the general norm for ppl moving out on their own from their parents.

Here [in Finland] typically ppl move out at ~16-24 years of age. Some later and some a year earlier. I was 20 when I moved out.

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Here it’s very random. Some move out early, some stay longer. If they start a study at a university that’s not close to their hometown, they have no choice but to move out. If the university of their choice is within reasonable distance, some choose to stay at home for convenience, some prefer to move out to seek freedom or whatever.
I’ve also known some people who were well in their 40’s or 50’s and were still living at home, but of course they are exceptions.

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It’s actually really random and depends on a variety of factors, such as, how open parents are to adaptation without their kid, if the person moving out is healthy or is suffering from some acute disease, if the family is well off or not, and, of course, the reason to move out.

I am 18 and was about to move out from my home this year because of my studies but I couldn’t due to the pandemic. I have cousins who have their own families now but still they are living with their parents.

It’s indeed a really random thing.

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Same here.
I don’t know any statistics. Children certainly still live with their parents, even if they already have families themselves. But that is more likely to be the case in agriculture or when the children plan to take over the business. Some couples move back with their young children to their parents in the countryside. But mostly they have at least separate apartments.

If the children have more urban jobs, it can happen even with parents who live in big cities that they live and stay alone. Some parents are very brave and move close to their children if they agree. The proportion of home ownership in our country is about 42%.

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In my country they typically move out when they find a partner, either to live with or to marry. Otherwise what’s the point of paying another rent, water, electricity, furnishing a whole apartment for only one person, when those cheap furnishings that nevertheless cost quite a bit if taken all together) won’t be suitable for his/her future family anyway?And of course buying groceries and cooking, all this double effort, when one pot can be made for all the family, with everybody helping in their own way?
This, of course, can only work if both sides respect each other: the family is respectful of the child’s personal life and does not restrict the child’s movements or visits of significant other etc., and in turn the child is respectful of the house and effort that goes into it, and contributes to the chores and to the bills, not expecting to be served like a little emperor. Mostly the children who move out have very narrow-minded and traditional families who stifle them. (And of course some move out because they go study in a different city, and then they stay there).
It’s so much better and cosier if people share the boring things and also the fun things. And you always have someone to talk to if you like, when you come home in the evening, you don’t come to a dark and empty home.

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Just as a reference, in kdrama ppl live til about 30, so I was wondering that I wouldn’t stand to live that long with my parents. :smiley:

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It depends here in the Netherlands! If you study far away from your parents’ house you usually live in a student apartment. Although you study ‘’ around the corner ‘’ you usually live with your parents because it is cheaper. Usually you leave home around the age of 20-30.:grin:

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Then what happens to those who never find a partner? :open_mouth:

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Here it depends on the area/city. Big cities usually have 40% singles/apartment, that does not necessarly mean they are all singles without a relationship although big cities have a higher amount of people without a relationship than smaller cities/countryside.

Another aspect is the North/East/South/West aspect. In West/Southern areas it is more common to live and stay with parents as adults or also as adult with own partner + kids but in the Northeast it is less common and if someone stays at parents’ home others will say silly things about not being independant and live alone (although and even when it makes not sense to move out just to move out when someone has to pay additional rent then and when there is enough space at the parents’ place).

Another aspect is that many people in big/er cities enjoy living together with roomates as young adults so some start that when they begin to study and some keep this living model even when their student’s life is over.

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They may stay with their parents, especially if one of them by then is dead, and the other would be lonely living all alone. Or if they prefer, they may move out later. It depends. Some of them don’t find “a” partner but are playboys, with several women. Those ones of course prefer to live alone.

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Of course no young adult just moves out, especially not with our rental prices. They go to study or training in other cities and usually live in shared apartements. Or they start to work in an other city. It’s also not just a question of independence, but that parents and young adults each want to have their own very different lives.

I can learn something from both systems. When it comes to “staying at home as long as …”, I immidiately think of the Japanese drama “Sumika Sumire” here at Viki.

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I’m guessing they never move out lol

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Haha, this one reminded me about The Cheese In The Trap, the protagonist and her parents lived in the same city yet they lived in different apartments. The protagonist was poor and couldn’t afford a standard meal yet she had the latest Samsung smartphone, better accessories than anybody else and never repeated any outfit.
:joy: JUST KDRAMA THINGS

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Imagine how expensive those standard meals must be! :rofl:

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:rofl::rofl: Probably more expensive than my entire house

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In the US for perhaps the past two decades we have the boomerang phenomenon of people moving back to live with parents - so people in late twenties, thirties, or even older move back to live with parents. In 2016, 64 million adults in the US lived in households with two or more generations, 64 million people is over 20% of the US population total, so definitely over 20% of the adults in the US. The most common reason is economic as it is a lot cheaper to live with parents, even if the adult child makes a token payment. Sometimes it is a matter of convenience to have grandparents available for child care when a single parent or with a couple are both employed. Or the younger adult moves back home to help take care of elderly parents. But the “empty nests” are no longer empty any more. And sometimes grandparents move in with adult children too.
Of course during the pandemic right now a majority of people up to age 29 are living with parents.

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Hmm, that’s interesting mindset, I feel that over here the mindset is more that only when reaching starvation level would one move back home. Since the government is obligated by the constitution to provide every citizen with a minimum living standard, which includes food and housing, there will only be something similar if the world economy collapses. :slight_smile:

So is it just for economic benefit or is it for economic need/must that ppl move back home? Just curious.

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@mattlock,
The answer is both, they are not interchangeable. The benefit is gained because of the need, as often is the case. Sigh! It’s a sad thing in so many ways.

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Here’s a good start for someone who is ready to move out. :wink:
I’d do this, and love it! It’s right up my alley! :joy: I sure don’t mind the reward at the end! :rofl::rofl::wink:

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I moved away from home at 16 (in Sweden you are considered adult at 18) because of family reasons. I personally think 19-20 is a slightly better age to get started with things (after graduating and perhaps have something of a plan).

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