Viki

Annoying subtitles that bothers Me/Myself and I/ to see them here at this site


#107

@mirjam_465

You don’t know how happy it makes me that you post this information here! It’s so valuable for me and others that hopefully will read this. Now, I can understand better why when I translate a Dutch to English sentence I feel it has a ‘‘wrong word’’ in it. But there is no such thing as a wrong word was used, and it’ just the word you guys have to use so that your sentence can make sense in the Dutch language. Precious information, and I really thank you from my heart so much.

I remember a sweet message from a sweet person, and something like that happened, but most likely it turns out the person wrote the sweet message in his/her language, and the translator gave the literal translation only (since is all the cheap machine translations (GT) can do). Unless they use an expensive or better quality translator that is designed to recognize, and correct those issues when we want to get a translation in any sentence (in many different language), if not, this problem will continue to go on. I saw a commercial from Japan, and I believe they have one of the BEST translators available from Japanese to English language so far.


#108

@damiechan

brugklas, onderbouw, bovenbouw = first year, lower, superstructure.

This is the reason why some subtitles/sentence make no sense when we see them in some dramas/movies because they don’t try to find a most common word to add, and use in the subtitle without an ounce of concern, the first word they see in the GT/translators. They don’t care if this word will be recognized by most viewers, and just want the count subtitle in their profile page go UP.

Lately, this situation is getting out of hand here, and they just need to communicate better within their team, and hopefully moderators and editors are willing to help those that need the help. I have been in those shoes; where I wrote to certain team member, and the answer was.; ‘‘look for it on your own’’ ‘‘If you don’t know you don’t belong in the team’’ and in some cases subbers get so scared they won’t ask again, but if you really want quality in your work, you won’t give up, and keep looking/asking to many other team members that are sweet, caring and willing to give you the information that you need.

If you feel those words in DUTCH from subbers can/will affect the sentence/subtitle in dramas, make sure you let the person using those words know, and suggest a more common word to use, that will make more sense when writing the subtitle/sentence in the drama/movie.
Writing notes also helped me a lot in the past, but I see that no one is making notes anymore and I wonder why…I hope they are not getting lazy bc it benefits so many in the long run, and keeps the drama with better quality work. Quantity is worth nothing, if quality is getting affected when we the viewers see these words that makes no sense at all, to us/the viewers.


#109

The funny thing about Dutch is that the Dutch spoken in the Netherlands and the Dutch spoken in Belgium have different ways of wording things. Sometimes the same words also have a different meaning. I usually never correct a moderator if I’m just a subtitler because the words she’s using are probably Dutch Dutch. When I’m a Dutch moderator, I usually ask @mirjam_465 to be my editor because that way I’m certain the subtitles will be understandable to people from both countries.
An example would be “to run.” In Dutch, they say ‘rennen’ (correct me if I’m wrong, haha), but in Flanders we use ‘lopen.’ ‘Lopen’ also exists in the Netherlands, but there it’s more often used as to walk.


#110

And you say “wandelen” when you mean “lopen,” while here “wandelen” means “to take a walk.”


#111

And we have “rennen” = fast running, “laufen” = running in a moderate way and “wandeln”.
Recognise the common ground.
But the last word sounds very mediaevally and has a second meaning, too.
So our third word is rather “gehen”.


#112

And wandern :grin:

Wandeln is mostly used for metaphors or poetic speech while wandern is hiking.


#113

I can only see a lot of Debbie Downer comments… uff…


#114

@damiechan @mirjam_465 @spaufler_89 @sonmachinima

I’m so glad that you guys have wonderful communication skills, and have worked out at other times with different words usage, so they can be recognized by all/most viewers. I wish other teams see that communication is the most important part of being part as a team member.

When team members work together in unity, the subtitles are so in tune you can’t tell there are many different subbers/people, doing different parts in the dramas/movies. I hope you guys serve as good role models to other teams that don’t like to work together, and it shows in their confusing/annoying subtitles that at times makes no sense, and we can see lately in some dramas.

I have learned so much from your input here, but the most important one; ‘‘that I can count on you guys;’’ if I ever have a question that pertains from Dutch to English or German to English since I know you are willing to share your knowledge with others. Thank you so much!


#115

@spaufler_89

spaufler_89But the last word sounds very mediaevally and has a second meaning, too.
So our third word is rather “gehen”.

Yes, in the end, the most ‘‘modern time/common word’’ is the one that makes common sense to use in the sentence/subtitle.

I’m very proud that you saw the issues with the other ‘‘medieval word,’’ and you worked out/decided to use the best one that will work the best in the sentence; for the pleasure of viewers. I know your subtitles/sentence have very good quality work in them. Thanks!


#117

That annoys me too. Everybody has their own unique style of writing.


#118

kate_1111
19hThat annoys me too. Everybody has their own unique style of writing.

Welcome to Discussion Board seeing that you just joined 19 hours ago.
Can you elaborate more on what is in your opinion; ‘‘their own unique style of writing?’’


#120

By unique style I meant conjunctions and phrasal verbs. I’m totally on board with you on the ‘mum’ thing. Sometimes there are ridiculous mistakes that could be corrected if people would go back and read what they wrote. Being a subtitler myself, I mean no disrespect to other volunteers. I know firsthand how hard it is when you do the job seriously.
But I don’t like the way you worded your response.


#121

I’m sorry if you feel that way is my ‘‘puertorican way of talking/writing’’ that bothers many, but the rest of what I wrote, it wasn’t directed to you. I should have not added your quoting in there, and instead just asked you what you meant by their own unique style of writing, and what you feel they are doing wrong (but you already did that). Thanks a lot. I’m glad others are seeing what is going on in here that is affecting the quality of the subtitles.


#122

Am I the only one that feel that something is not right in this subtitle?

Summary

image

This is the same scene and both subs are there

Summary

image


#123

There you go:
image

Just by looking at the sentence (comma at the end), anyone can say it’s not complete. Here is the complete sentence:

Now you can judge better, if there’s something wrong with the subtitle or not.


#124

Have no idea what you are trying to say here, but compared to the other subtitle for the same scene is still not making a lot of sense. Instead of changing the subject you should have answered if you feel that sentence makes sense or not.

[BY THE WAY, the scene posted by @shraddhasingh is not the scene/subtitle I was talking about. You can click above on Summary to understand what I’m writing about in here.]

Also, there are 2 names as English Editors in a drama, and those 2 subbers have not been active for 3 years here at viki nor they contributed in that drama as subber, moderator or Editor; so why are they being added in the drama? All this time @irmar had mentioned this, and now I saw it with my own eyes. Total shocker. Are you working in that drama by any chance?
There’s nothing wrong in that subtitle: [I guess it would be a difficult relationship for you to understand] What do you see there that I’m not seeing?

Wait…that the word [would] should have been [must]? I missed that one…my bad lol

PS. I added the same scene/ in the same drama (different places/sites though) with the different subtitle in it, so you can compare or understand where I’m coming from. WORD USAGE is what I’m ‘‘talking about’’


#125

No.

(I need to have at least 10 characters to be able to post it.)


#126

Even the subtitle/sentence which I was told comes from NETFLIX had some flaws in them,
but will not discuss that one since it does makes more sense written as is and since I have no Korean sentence to compare it to, I can’t do much in that department.

THE WORDS [PERSPECTIVE/MEASURE] ARE OUT OF CONTEXT HERE, AND I
HONESTLY WISHED I WAS GIVEN THE SENTENCE IN KOREAN, TO HAVE AN OVERALL
IDEA WHAT WORDS WERE USED IN KOREAN, SO I CAN MATCH THEM UP WITH THE
PROPER ENGLISH WORDS.

A) BEING THAT IS YOU, WHO IS ALWAYS COMPETING WITH YOUR FAMILY MEMBERS,

  1. From your viewpoint, where family members are always competing against each other,

  2. Coming from you, where your family members are always competing against each other,

Summary

image

B) I CAN SAY THAT IS THE KIND OF RELATIONSHIP YOU WOULD NEVER UNDERSTAND.

  1. I guess it’s the kind of relationship you wouldn’t be able to understand.

  2. I guess it’s the kind of relationship you seemed not able to understand.

  3. I guess it could be a relationship hard for you to understand.

  4. I guess it MUST be the kind of relationship you wouldn’t be able to understand.

Summary

image

IF YOU DON’T CARE TO READ EVERYTHING I WROTE HERE, AT LEAST READ THIS: YOU DON’T COMPETE WITH EACH OTHER; YOU COMPETE AGAINST EACH OTHER,
ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO BUSINESS DEAL. THIS IS THE CASE IN THIS
DRAMA. NO MATTER WHICH WAY I TRIED TO MAKE SENSE OF THE WORD [WHICH] I
CAME TO THE CONCLUSION IT WAS SO OUT OF CONTEXT. IT CAN’T BE USED IN THAT SENTENCE THEN, WE HAVE [DIFFICULT] RELATIONSHIP IS MORE PRESENT
TENSE AS ‘‘THEY HAVE A DIFFICULT RELATIONSHIP.’’

IT’S HARD [FOR YOU] TO UNDERSTAND THAT KIND OF RELATIONSHIP.

I think if people study the past tense, past participle etc. etc, and all that mambo jambo, they would be more familiar how to create a sentence that makes more sense without the need to be using ‘‘fancy’’ or ‘‘big words’’ as we call them, that in the end, won’t work in the sentence or in any other sentence.

PS>>>I believe that English sentence was translated from a SPANISH sentence based on the words they use [measure] [perspective] [with].


#130

At least, I think they didn’t finish editing the drama yet. I think they progressed to episode 11.

Lately, I have worked on a HK movie with no punctuation or rather weird punctuation (lots of ;). Afterwards I had about 1200 subs more for mainly putting “.” etc. everywhere.


#133

Example of a what I call a ‘‘backward sentence’’
All That Girl is good at, is working. (acceptable)
Not
Work Is All She’s Good at, that Girl. (incorrect)

Summary

Another example of ‘‘backward sentence’’
[Incorrect: I’ve upset you again I see, aunt]

I see I got you upset again, aunt. or (Subject first) Aunt, I see I got you upset again. (acceptable)

Maybe if they drop/stop the use of so many contractions in the subs, they will get a clearer meaning in the subtitle/sentence. Contractions can be confusing to a lot of non- proficient in English viewers, and it can also make the sentence seem more confusing to the translator/subber.

Breaking down this subtitle.

I have upset you again I see, Aunt.
I see I have upset you again, Aunt.
I see I got you upset again, Aunt.

NOTE:
I’ve’’ is standard British English for “I have”. It’s a question of avoiding contractions is best: so that it makes others (viewers) have a clear picture of the message conveyed in the sentence.

If they had not used the contraction, when they read the sentence to themselves, they would have been able to pinpoint the flaw/mistake in the subtitle/sentence.

Summary

To be fair, it might be a pre-subbed drama. No matter what the case is, contractions in subtitles must/should be avoided as much as possible. Thanks!

@angelight313_168
USING this sentence as an example why contractions affect the way people read a sentence and can’t tell something is wrong there

He’d clearly had too much to drink (not that I blamed him).

If I’m guessing right: He’d must be: He Had. It can’t clearly be He would either. Right?

But if you look again the word HAD is written again in the sentence which obviously makes this contraction incorrect in this sentence. WHY?

He clearly HAD too much to drink (not that I blamed him).

If we break the sentence is something like this: HE HAD CLEARLY HAD TOO MUCH TO DRINK. The same way you don’t use double negatives in a sentence you don’t use the word HAD in that sentence because IT IS grammatically incorrect.