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Do you have plants? If yes which one and how do you care it for?


#141

Great idea for my family! They struggle to have any plants lol I just gave them a youtube link to do it like it! :heart_eyes: This is very nice + you can also make flowers on top of the cactus if you want some color ^^


#142

Nah, they smell bad, draw a bunch of bugs into the apartment and are generally a nuisance. Plus, there’s plenty of nature outside my door :stuck_out_tongue:


#143

Plants smell bad? What are you doing to the poor things. :slight_smile:


#144

They tend to end up dead…


#145

not if you learn to take care of them right, hehe me losing some too.

my “plant” for the day
image

heres a real plant


Why We Love It: Its waxy, colorful foliage adds a splash of color in any room—without taking up a lot of space.

Name: Peperomia spp.

Growing Conditions: Low to medium light; 60-75°F; allow the soil surface to dry between waterings

Size: To 1 foot tall and wide

Note: This plant is poisonous if eaten or chewed on by dogs or cats.

Buy It: Watermelon Peperomia, $17.99, Walmart

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Chinese Evergreen

chinese evergreen gray pot houseplant

CREDIT: JACOB FOX

This plant’s leaves feature various shades of silver, gray, and green, making Chinese evergreen an attractive choice to brighten low-light areas of your home. You’ll often see them in shopping mall or airport plantings because they are so adaptable and durable, yet attractive.

Why We Love It: Those attractive leaves really help brighten a dim corner.

Size: To 3 feet tall and wide

Note: All parts of this plant are poisonous and can cause severe irritation of the lips, tongue, and throat if eaten or chewed by pets or children.

Buy It: Aglaonema Sapphire Suzanne, $24.98, The Home Depot

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Grape Ivy

![](data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns=‘http://www.w3.org/2000/svg’%20viewBox='0%200%20100%2067’%3E%3C/svg%3E)

CREDIT: DENNY SCHROCK

‘Ellen Danica,’ the variety of grape ivy pictured here is also called oakleaf ivy because its leaves are more deeply cut than other types of grape ivy. No matter which variety you choose, the tendrils on a vine of grape ivy will easily cling to a trellis or a stake. Its shiny, deep green leaves also create a nice texture for an indoor hanging basket.


#146

anyone have elephant ears ( the plant)with me being a frustrated writer, yes, I seen this as funny, and I wrote & asked!!

if so, do you put it inside when it gets cold, how do you take care of it, oh I know Google it, but what better way to make a friend??


#147

heres somthing of interest

looks like I may be starting to do this


#148

nice info! :joy:


#149

I have always wanted to grow a Herb garden, I just found some steps & ideas to do so . this link gives a lot of info. hope some one likes it

GROWING HERBS INDOORS

It’s fun to grow herbs indoors, but caring for them can be a bit of a struggle. Two of the most important things to consider before getting started are choosing the right varieties to grow, and also the best location.

CHOOSING THE BEST HERBS FOR GROWING INDOORS

There are tons of different kinds of herbs that grow well inside, and many can live as houseplants for several years. Keep in mind that some are annual plants, and therefore will only live for about a year.

So, when choosing which ones to keep inside, look for perennial herbs if you want them to live the longest. Here’s a quick list of a few types that do well inside…

  • Rosemary
  • Parsley (biannual)
  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Cilantro (annual)
  • Oregano
  • Lavender
  • Chives
  • Mint
  • Basil (annual)

===============================================================================
heres another on how to propiogate the herbs

by homesteadgardening

I also have started garlic inside, planning to do some ginger too, just something different, got a bunch of seeds, thought I would do the indoor planting of them and see what happens

and one more thing, hydroponics…


#150

my garlic is coming up very nicely![/quote]


#151

ok y’all here ya go!

someone crocheted a flower garden!! neat huh?


#152

I couldn’t find any Neem oil but I bought these yellow fly stickers and tablets to dissolve in water and water the plants to kill the eggs/larvae. It seems that it helped since I have no more infestation or see them flying around. When I have time I will repot them. I read online to put new soil in a microwave to kill any pest or eggs that can occur before adding to plants, of course the soil needs to cool down.

Also as per your recommendation to save the orchid I placed it in water and changed water frequently and it miraculously sprouted a new bloom stem but not much of a root. I transplanted it into coconut shells and it seems to do fine. :heart_eyes:, I’m so happy!!!


#153

There are many online shops, where you can buy it, for example:

https://www.landi.ch/shop/garteninsektizide_100303/neem-azal-t-s-biogarten_57819#


#154

@somejuwels I looked in garden center (Jumbo) and then bought the products I said, the other neem mix was likely sold and I wanted a quick solution. I read online that you need to kill also the larvae from hatching which are in soil and the neem oil probably wouldn’t do it… I’ll be buying neem oil time to have it on hand, thank you for the link :rose: :wink:

I also looked in Landi and I saw that one but it didn’t say flies, lol… I have the Solbac Tabs from the same company and the flies are “Trauermücken” in German.
https://www.landi.ch/shop/garteninsektizide_100303/tabs-gegen-trauermuecken-solbac_13772


#155

I used neem oil to kill the caterpillars of the box three moth (Buchsbaumzünsler) which is invading Germany, a Chinese moth. It was very helpful, although I lost the battle in the end. The moth army was too big and the caterpillars were so gluttonous.


#156


#157

I can totally relate to that though! :sweat_smile::joy:


#158

Planning the new garden season, I want to grow more veggies in my garden. And couldn’t restrain myself from buying lots of seeds :smile: And have now more than 15 different kinds of tomatoes. Spring, where are you?


#159

sounds great, and so do I. maybe that will get motivated too


#160

how are these?

“Snow weighs down a cluster of bamboo creating a natural tunnel across the road nearby the Huguenot Bridge,” Matt G. wrote.
Richmond Virginia, USA