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History around the world


#41

Well, well … She probably was stateless, in times of the Nazi regime, Jewish people “lost” their German citizenship. There was a discussion in the Netherlands to make her a citizen of the Netherlands posthumously, but by the law it is not possible to give citizenship to a dead person.


#42

Either way, she lived most of her life in The Netherlands.


#43

I didn’t know that!!


#44

What I recall is that German was banned in their annex, and they spoke Dutch too. Wikipedia says she was German till 1941 and thereafter she was stateless.
So German or Dutch both will do, I suppose


#45

If her family had chosen to go to the place of her other family members in Switzerland, maybe we would have heard of her differently.
Her cousin was an actor well known I remember that I liked to listen to him whenever he did an interview about Anne. He died a few years ago in his late 80’s.


#46

Yeah, :sweat_smile: but I don’t have a logical explanation why Lord Vishnu and his encarnations are Blue but people say just like the sky is endless and is blue, Lord Vishnu is blue was well.


He has already taken his 9 incarnations and is about to take his 10th which was supposed to be taken in Kal Yug that is this era. People say that he’ll be seen coming on a white horse with his hair open and will be called Kalki. He’ll come when the world has fallen to the evils and is about to end and will come and save His people from misery and helplessness


#47

They also have one with an elephant head. :slight_smile:

She was born in Germany, but moved to The Netherlands when she was 4. Her German nationality was officially taken away from her in 1941, but by then she’d been living in The Netherlands already for 8 years or so. Her diary was also written in Dutch.

afbeelding


#48

wow! so cool to find out that in my “younger years” hehehehe, I sure don’t remember that in my history lessons! but thanks so much for sharing this.


#49

I just ate a bad grape while reading :flushed::confounded: It’s so interesting that I didn’t notice it at all… :sweat_smile:
This is such a special thread, thanks for that :slight_smile::smiling_face_with_three_hearts:


#50

Yuk! :nauseated_face:

But I’m glad your enjoying our thread. :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:


#51

Yeah, He is Lord Ganesha. It is interesting to note that His parents are both Gods and not biological. The myth says that when Goddess Parvati (his mother) was going to take a bath on Mt. Kailash in Himalayas (where the family is said to live) she didn’t had anybody to guard while she took a bath so before going in, she took out all her dirt from her body and created a human figure whom she named Ganesha, she ordered him to not allow anyone inside their home. While he was on guard, Lord Shiva(who also happens to be blue and has a snake on his neck) came to his home but Ganesha prohibited him saying his mother won’t allow anyone to enter. Lord Shiva didn’t knew at that time who that kid is, so they had a really powerful fight in which Ganesha lost his head and was defeated. Later when Parvati came out and found out what happened to Ganesha, she scolded Lord Shiva a lot. As an apology, Shiva sent his ride(who’s a bull) Nandi to bring the head of the first living being he sees. On his way to get the head, he saw an elephant who was born for this purpose and he happily gave his head away to Ganesha. And that’s how he was given the elephant head.

Hindu Gods have really different and unique rides as well. Lord Ganesha’s ride is a Mouse called Moosak


You can see the family and their rides in this picture. The lion is the Goddesse’s ride.


#52

I studied Religious Studies in the past and we also had a course about Indian religions, but oh, man, it was so complicated and I forgot a lot.


#53

She was born in 1929 in Frankfurt/Main, Germany, her parents German, too. In 1934 her family immigrated to the Netherlands, Amsterdam, after they lost their German citizenship. Although she wrote her diaries in Dutch and was raised in the Netherlands, she never got the Dutch citizenship. There was a discussion in the Netherlands some years ago to give her the Dutch citizenship posthumously. Both, Frankfurt and Amsterdam, claim her to be the famous daughter of their city :slight_smile:


#54

Gengus Khan’s grandfather was Qabul aka Chabul Khan, he was the first khan, who unified the Mongolian tribes. After his death his “empire” crumbled very soon, until his grandson Gengus Khan was born. He could unify the tribes again and conquered the Tartarian tribes, before he started his conquest of China and East Europe/Russia. A very interesting part of history :slight_smile:


#55

I guess, he is the one with the largest family tree ever :flushed::grimacing:


#56

@kaorikazehaya

You didn’t hurt anyone I guess you posted your comment before I explained about the Cacique’s from Puerto Rico and the Native American Indians. I’m sorry you felt hurt but that wasn’t my intention. I love your quote We should learn lessons from history and not history lessons very wise indeed…:hugs:


Hope you can see this in your region. I worked as a segmenter and subber (spanish). Many of the stories here, are similar to the ones in the Bible in the Old Testament.

I have Ann Frank book for years now
image
Annelies Marie “Anne” Frank was a German-Dutch diarist of Jewish origin. One of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust, she gained fame posthumously with the publication of The Diary of a … Wikipedia

Born: June 12, 1929, Frankfurt, Germany

Died: February 1945, Stalag XI-C, Germany

Citizenship: German until 1941; Stateless from 1941

That has me thinking if both of your parents are from Puerto Rico and you are born in the island of Puerto Rico you are considered 100% Puerto Rican. If your parents are from USA, you are considered 100% American (Caucasian). Since both of Anne Frank parents were Jewish; doesn’t that make her 100% Jewish? She was Jewish born in Germany. I was raised almost all my life in USA, but I don’t consider myself that I’m American. I am and feel 100% Puerto Rican although I practically lived most of my life in US. I am considered an American /US Citizen by the laws enacted back who knows what year (I forgot) but when someone ask me: where are you from? I don’t say I’m American from USA. I always say I’m Puerto Rican, from Puerto Rico (even though I hardly lived in Puerto Rico) So let’s say the child’s parents are Hindu but the child is born in USA; Do you see the child as American or Hindu? If a child’s parents are Russian but the child was born in USA: do you consider that child Russian or American?


#57

Yes, she was Jewish but it is a religion not a state, so indeed as a Jewish person she got her German citizenship taken away and from then on was without a citizenship of any country.


#58

Jewish is a religion and an ethnicity, but not a nationality.

I guess I would call the Russian child an “American of Russian descent”. But the child might have a different idea about it.


#59

I thought it was Judaism the religion. Jewish because they are the descendant of Israel/Jerusalem etc…

PS. That was the point I was trying to make that just because they took away her German Citizenship that doesn’t mean she wasn’t a Jewish girl born in Germany. In other words a German of Jewish descent.


#60

The religion is called Judaism, but the people who adhere to that religion are called Jews. You can be Jewish by both religion and ethnicity, but also one of them. So an ethnic Jew without a religion or with a different religion is still a Jew.
In the religious meaning you are a Jew if your mother is a Jew. Doesn’t matter what your father is, only the mother counts. That rule comes of course from the time in which it was not possible to determine for sure who the father was …
It’s possible for non-Jews to convert to Judaism, but it’s not easy. When it’s your “birth right” to be Jewish, you can bend the rules a little and still be Jewish. But if not, then you have to closely follow all the rules, including having two fridges, two stoves and not flushing the toilet on Saturdays.

Yes, she was still Jewish.