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The South Korean Entertainment Industry Needs To Either Shape Up Or Ship Out


#41

Adreian, hate the thought of you leaving here, light in the darkness.
one little girl came to mind.she didn’t kill herself, she was murdered, but wonder if down the line she would have been one of these statistics? really heartbreaking that these young kids have to go through that!

Your stories and the poems are beautiful. really hope to hear more from you. hope we can keep in touch.


#42

There’s the Convention on the Rights of the Child from 1990 signed by South Korea, USA, France and other countries (https://indicators.ohchr.org/)

Article 32 https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx

  1. States Parties recognize the right of the child to be protected from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to be hazardous or to interfere with the child’s education, or to be harmful to the child’s health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development.

  2. States Parties shall take legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to ensure the implementation of the present article. To this end, and having regard to the relevant provisions of other international instruments, States Parties shall in particular:

(a) Provide for a minimum age or minimum ages for admission to employment;

(b) Provide for appropriate regulation of the hours and conditions of employment;

© Provide for appropriate penalties or other sanctions to ensure the effective enforcement of the present article.

In France, we have artist children playing in movies, theaters and babies in advertisements (Evian water). You can work from 14 or 16 in some sectors. Under this age, in some sectors too.

But it’s restricted by labour laws and authorization comes from a commission (a children judge, a doctor, etc.) that will study many factors (will it goes against the child’s future, his health state, his school life / ethics and difficulty of the job).
[If you want to read in Fr:
http://www.leparisien.fr/culture-loisirs/que-dit-la-loi-sur-le-travail-des-enfants-artistes-09-03-2017-6746223.php
https://www.journaldunet.com/ebusiness/expert/70429/les-enfants-influenceurs---quand-l-enfant-devient-une-marque--quelles-limites.shtml
https://sfa-cgt.fr/sites/default/files/artistes%20interprètes%20de%20moins%20de%2016%20ans.pdf]

For ex
Min age for artists: + 3 months
Working time: depending on the age and during holidays/school: from 30 min - 4h30 a day
Theater: + 9 yo, 1 play a day, max 3 a week
Cinema, TV: must have a referee adult, can’t work from 0-6 a.m.
Min: 300 euros
Salaries blocked in a state bank that keeps it for them until they’re 18 years old, age of legal majority in France. Parents can’t touch it.
You have trials with parents and their children who are now adults because of the money partition from the child’s work.

Unboxing, Sharenting: Problems with YouTube and children advertising toys or parents life in a regular basis and parents getting the money from it, it’s still new in regards of laws and… it’s parents decision, children telling they’re doing it for fun…

How can some children react when reading hateful comments?


#43

Botox for kids…in your video…the kids should sue their parents later for abuse.

I think the laws in Germany are similar to France (what is allowed for which age and in which way).

We have some TV talent shows with kids but it is mostly something like singing or playing an instrument that does not harm the kids and they are dressed like kids and don’t do adult moves/poses.

I didn’t heard about the kids bellydancers yet, just about some very young pole dancers in East European TV shows.


#44

You could say hello in the forums though from time to time since it’s not only about Korean and the community members are not involved with its industry.

Anyway I wish you all the best, especially for your health!


#45

I think we are talking about two different girls because the girl I mean has an African American father and a multiethnical mother (African American/Mexican/Filipino) and she’s still living in the USA together with her family. Both of her parents were former bodybuilders.


#46

Russians are very competitive and very desperate because many (most?) of them come from a poor background and excellence in something like sport or the arts has been the only way for someone to escape a dreary life and get money, fame, the “good life”. That’s why even in the field of sports there has been abuse.
When my son was little he had taken up ice skating. Well, there was a little girl of about 7, the daughter of the teacher there, a Russian lady who had been a champion of ice figure skating in her youth. I was appalled to witness how harsh and demanding she was with her daughter, pushing her to practice and practice until she was exhausted. Once we talked briefly about this and she told me that in the world of competitive sports it’s either this or you remain a nobody. If you are to do it, you have to do it like that to even have a chance. I understood her point of view, but still the teary face of that gaunt little girl has stayed with me till today.
Same can happen in the world of classical music.
There was a very beautiful Chinese film, Together, about a child violin prodigy. If you can find it, do watch it.


#47

Leaving Viki to watch other things, but not Discussions, I hope. Firstly, I wouldn’t be motivated to post again. Secondly, I genuinely think it’s important to talk about this stuff, praising the industry when it does good and criticising it when it does bad. Dramas prosper according to their audience, after all.

PS: Thank you so much for sharing my stories :heart:


#48

Can you keep in touch with umbrella? You are a great person who can help others. I already requested my account close and will not come here or any of viki’s forum. Keep up the good work!
PS. Hope this message goes through. Bye :cry:


#49

I’m not going to say Bye because I plan to email you from time to time, if it’s alright with you. Also, who is Umbrella?!


#50

Here’s my two cents about this topic. I remember watching Shinee’s performance in 2016 - one of their Tokyo concerts - for the very first time, and my first thought was how they resembled well cheoreographed dancing dolls and my next thought was how exhausting this must be to keep doing this repetitively for so many years. I grew to love them as I watched and learned more about them in the successive years so I knew that Jonghyun wasn’t private or quiet about his depression. As a later fan, I realized he reached out for help in several ways over the years - he even referred to it in some shows like Knowing Bros, - but for some reason his depresson finally ended up taking him.

What occurs to me is that we make a lot of noise over Jonghyun and Sulli because they are idols and trials as preformers was very public. But what about the ‘quiet suicides’ that no one makes a big deal over? What about Jeon Mi Seon - a brilliant supporting actress - who killed herself in a bath tub, or Ha Ji Won’s younger brother - Jun Tae Soo - and a host of others who I read about and breaks my heart, but no one else wonders what happened to them except to say RIP, you will be missed? I think we should be appalled by the entertainment circle as a whole, and life in SK that makes it seem that suicide is the only acceptable way out of depression for them. Let’s not only focus on the high profile cases, but on their society as a whole. As these performers are a fraction of their society, it makes me wonder about the multitude of nameless, faceless suicides that go on all the time in that part of the world, where no one knows their names or even cares that they are gone. Let’s look at the bigger picture, instead of just being carried away by the news cycle or the latest headlines.

These are just my thougths, it’s in no way a reflection on anyone’s comments here. But when I read the news from that part of the world - which I follow closely. I bleed inside at how much pressure the average Korean faces everyday. Most of their dramas are reflects the pressure that most people in their society face.


#51

We should ask ourselves if suicide rate only matters if it’s about celebs or one’s actual idol country or if we do also care when it’s about people who aren’t idols at all.

http://worldpopulationreview.com/countries/suicide-rate-by-country/

According to the World Health Organization, the suicide rate in South Korea is the 10th highest in the world. One factor in its high suicide rate is suicides among the elderly. Traditionally, children have been expected to care for their aging parents; however, because this system has largely disappeared in the twenty-first century, many elderly people commit suicide, so they do not feel like they are a financial burden on their families.

The government of South Korea is making efforts to curb the suicide epidemic. It is striving to increase access to mental healthcare, a necessity as 90% of suicide victims in South Korea may have a diagnosable and treatable mental health condition. It is also providing education to community leaders to help prevent suicides at a local level.

In Japan, suicide borders on a crisis level, though the government has been active in intervention to decrease the risk of suicide among vulnerable populations. It is the leading cause of death in men among the ages of 20-44 and for women among the ages of 15 to 34.

In Japanese culture, suicide, in some circumstances, has long been viewed as an honorable way to die. Consider the kamikaze pilots during World War II, whose greatest honor was to dive-bomb a plane into an Allied warship and die in the process. The practice of military suicide has been going on since at least the time of the Samurai warlords and is one factor in Japan’s high suicide rate.

In China, suicide is the fifth leading cause of death and accounts for over one-quarter of suicides worldwide. In contrast with many Western countries, in which men are more likely to commit suicide, most suicide victims in China are women. China’s economic boom has led to greater independence for women, who are now much more able to get divorced as a means of dealing with domestic violence. However, the strain of divorce means that they must work long hours while raising their children, often without the support of family that the culture has traditionally relied on in the past.

People in rural parts of China are as much as five times more likely to commit suicide than people in cities. This notion may be attributed to a lack of mental healthcare, the stigma associated with mental illnesses (such as schizophrenia), poverty, and poor education. However, exact statistics are hard to come by because few to no epidemiological studies on suicide have been carried out by the Chinese government.

Sweden has a very low suicide rate, but this rate can be misleading because it may not account for physician-assisted suicide, which is legal there. In 2012, Sweden only had 12 reported suicides per 100,000 people.

Historically, Sweden has had a high suicide rate, with the most suicides in the developed world during the 1960s. That may have been due, at least in part, to cultural attitudes regarding suicide and long, dark winters, particularly in the northern regions. The government responded to the crisis with social welfare and mental health services, and the numbers have dropped dramatically. Today, Scandinavian countries – Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Finland – have very high rates of happiness and relatively low suicide rates. However, the dark winters – 20 hours of darkness or more in each day in some areas – causes seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a form of depression, which has been known to correlate with higher rates of suicide.


#52

There’s another topic ppl talked about suicide and depression in general, independantly of the status if you’d like to participate too (from the same author):

Suicide topic has come more than 1, we talked about normal people and celebrities.
There are also other dark topics on this forum.
I don’t think it means that ppl are indifferent when they don’t talk about suicide or misery.
Silence is sometimes the only answer we can give (the immigrate mom and her baby hugging and found at the bottom of the sea near Italy, muslims camps in a part of China, abuse where the mother forced her child to eat cockroaches in France, babies factories in Africa, father at 11 years old because raped by his babysitter multiple times in America, all the misery in the world, can we all talk about it?)

A life is a life.

Death doesn’t discriminate. We all finish the same way in the end.


#53

@ adrianmorales I agree with your comments, this industry It’s all about MONEY. The only big CEO and owner is Park Jin-young also known as JYP he is the only one who have set out to change the way Idols are handle in his company. He was on YouTube and TV talking about how his company will be and is presently setting up Counselors for any mental or personally problems for the idols, along with Nutritionist for better health when eatting. Those are just a some of changes JYP mention, there are other good changes. Hopefully other CEOs will following suit and do better. Because being an idol is not all Roses and Wine. Sometime the price of Fame is not worth it. :expressionless:


#54

Funny thing, I was just thinking about JYP and how well they’ve treated Twice’s Mina. I should write a post, a positive one. It’s not all doom and gloom, after all.


#55

yes we have just talked about the idols and all, what about the kids (people) that arent idols, I do hate to admit it, I as a senior do look around and see a bunch of the senior folk taking that route, again cause no one cares, and their kids kinda sorta neglect them,
and top of the list is bullying. I hope that the boys that started something here (NC) helping someone that was bullied. hope y’all seen it. and whats amazing in itself? 2 black boys helping a white boy. awesome!! I really pray this does stop, a small act of kindness goes a long way.


#56

@adrianmorales

You can e mail me anytime. I was at the Hospital until 2:30 am. I came to see if account was deactivated but I’m glad I can respond to you. @umbrella wrote this a while back and I just wanted someone to get in touch with her. We went off topic there so her message is in what are you watching?. I hope if she sees this she knows that we are here for her.

umbrella

1d

By the way I was bullied all this summer and have called a crisis line several times and have felt I am going to have a breakdown which scared me a lot. So I’m speaking from having been bullied. I’ve been bullied before that. You need strong support and you need to re-build your own self esteem and once you have gotten out the part about the bullying then I feel like you need to stop giving that attention. I mean giving attention to what that stupid person thought. I also was gossiped about but you also have to at some point just say so what? If the people listening to that person believe them then THEY are the one with the problem, not me. I know the truth about that person (the bully).


#57

yinks
What occurs to me is that we make a lot of noise over Jonghyun and Sulli because they are idols and trials as preformers was very public. But what about the ‘quiet suicides’ that no one makes a big deal over? What about Jeon Mi Seon - a brilliant supporting actress -

I wrote This Back in June 30 (4 months ago)

A cry for help, and who listens to them. How DEPRESSION is killing SK actress/actors.
korea-actress-jeon-mi-seon-dies-dead-in-apparent-suicide-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VVMpr1c5aA

As a survivor of several suicide attempts, I can assure you I wasn’t focusing on the idol status of sulli or anyone else’s. As a matter of fact, I never saw her as an ‘‘idol’’ but a victim of this Agencies and selfish parents (mother in her case) who force them to live that Hell life/condition that drives them to suicide.

They try to blame it on ppl having ‘‘mental issues’’ but these mental issues are born/made in most cases through some tragic events in life (my case), and in sulli’s and many ‘‘idol’s’’ case the career they are FORCED in to continue on although it destroys them in the end.
I also wrote about high rates of suicide in Asian countries bc of the pressure in excelling in their studies and job/career performance somewhere around here. So if you got the impression I was writing about this subject bc of an ‘‘idol’’ you are wrong. As a survivor, as a parent, as a human being that loves everyone no matter their nationality,gender or belief I can assure you my pain comes from the love I feel for my brothers and sisters in Christ.


#58

@angelight313_168

How about keeping your account and just don’t login?

You may regret it otherwise when you come back at some point and all your badges and event icons are gone.

(That’s what usually happens to gamers who say they leave forever, delete their characters or account and later they’ll regret it and some even have to buy all games again because of that)


#59

@angelight313_168

You’re leaving?? Oh, I’ll miss you on Viki! :worried: I enjoy reading your comments and seeing your perspective on issues. I hope everything goes well for you in your health, your family, and your life. Que Dios te bendiga–voy a rezar a Dios por ti :slight_smile: I wish you all the best


#60

I beleive there should be some new change in the entertainment industry in Korea, Japan and other asian countries. They consider the box office, celebrity endorsement, money they earn and the so-called fame as a great success no matter what kind of deal, corrupt and exploitation.