Funny subbing mistakes

That’s so interesting, I went back to check and it wasn’t reverted back to its presub. I wonder why it appeared like that for you.

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The episode’s scenes. By delivering babies, maybe you mean concieve. He, who is actually a she, is seriously wounded.
It’s like a cat, playing with a catch before it eats it really. And the catch trying to coax the cat to focus on bigger problems. Then the cat discovers, it’s catch is mateable material. Hence the name the V -team created. :heart:




Interesting, could it be the time zone?

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Oh, I understand now. Lol, we were talking about different scenes.
This exact line also appeared as a presub in Episode 1, which we have edited. We haven’t edited Episode 10 yet.

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Frankly I feel out of my depth in that world - also haven’t watched the drama yet, so I wouldn’t venture a suggestion. But what you put makes sense because it suggests that daemons and humans have different “rules” and categories, with the corollary that male daemons cannot mate with female humans and the opposite (if that’s the meaning)

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A wrongly worded idom.


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:rofl: It’s almost like the FL is thinking ‘Hmmmm, I think you’re saying it wrong’

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Am I to picky now? You might be able to jump from a mountain, building or bridge …
But a river?
Jump into … Or am I wrong?
Even the hard sub was written that way.

Sorry, @simi11 I didn’t get much further into the movie.

As we can see one doesn’t have to type exactly what the hard subs show …
Typo-alert! I read it 3 times didn’t make sense, when I finally looked at the hard subs … Haha, I can’t even, will I ever get to finish watching that movie?

P.S.: You might have thought 21 hrs later I should have finished the movie. No, I have not, I watched a bit more and fell asleep. When I woke up again, this … could not be loaded … error … reloaded the page … shows no subs … reloaded again … movie starts from the get go … I have not memorized the minute where I left off. Just didn’t want any longer, so trying now …
Guess what?

The video could not be loaded … error … reload again … start from the get go … to be continued … :rofl:

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I didn’t ask… but I struggle with some subs here too… in particular when it comes to translate nonsense sentence that requires some fantasy to comprehend what’s meant. I believe only the pre-subbed projects are affected. - It’s a pity that Viki seems not to care.

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Oh, yeah … I can feel it. I would never be jealous of such a project. It’s as if you need to contact the Eng subber or editor all the time and ask, “What do you want to say with those lines?”

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Chorei de rir.

A presubbed title. Translation was wholly literal, it became quite lol funny. :sweat_smile:
If editors didn’t know of this proverb “赔了夫人又折兵” which came from “Romance of the Three Kingdoms” novels, it’d probably have been missed since it’s literally correct and there’s no grammar error.
image

The dialogue:

Summary

image

image

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@jadecloud88,
haha! :rofl: More like devastating, if they want to go the literal route. :wink:

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Well screen shot won’t show the picture… but the sentence should say:
“Let’s sell the mart quickly and divide up the money” :laughing:

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Is “to divvy up” slang?
As it is in my dictionary, may not be in use or often heard, but it is neither marked as belonging to a country (GB, AUS, NZ) nor as slang …

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It’s not slang in Australia, but it’s not a word that’s used often. There would be many people who have not heard of this word in my country, so a more easily understood word like share, split, divide, etc., would definitely work better.

Interestingly it seems as if it is slang in the US.

Divvy definition in American English | Collins English Dictionary (collinsdictionary.com)

The “word frequency” information shows that as in Australia, it’s not used much in the US.

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It is slang here in the US, but it’s fairly common, at least in my circles. We would probably use “split the money” most frequently, but I think we’d actually use “divvy” more often than “divide.”

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Well my search also found Divvy is a software program, an expense management so it’s a guess. Also a bike sharing company called “Divvy” in Chicago. I also wonder did they use in Korean also such slang, should American slang be used since it’s used in that country. Same counts for “wanna, gonna” and that sort. In the end we are watching a Korean show… so what do you think? Perhaps split would be more fitting since these are young friends talking.

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As an editor, I’ve been trained to replace slang as much as possible, so I would use either “split” or “divide.” It’s sort of the ongoing debate, right? Clearly there would be instances when characters are likely using slang, but we are always mindful that other languages are using the English to translate from, and the use of slang or idioms and such complicates that process. Is it better to replace it? Is it better to leave it and add a translator’s note? I’m not sure there is a right answer that covers every scenario.

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We already have translators’ notes for Korean/Chinese/Japanese terms, it would be really too much to have to also explain the English.
Viki is an international platform, not only the Other Language translators but also the viewers often use the English subtitles.
I believe it should be an International English devoid of regional slang. Not dumbed down, but without too many American-only references, without unexplained acronyms etc.

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I actually agree with that for practical purposes on Viki, but I do notice times on a personal level when it’s obvious that some of the “flavor” in the original language is being lost because of it. It can’t really be helped, but it’s why there remains differing opinions on the topic.

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